Discipline Maturity Lifecycle: Enterprsie Architecture example

Spent this morning thinking about operating models in IT organizations and ITIL initiatives.   After a few minutes of pondering , hearing a group next to me at a conference extol the virtues of the 4hr days a few thoughts came back to me; the IT discipline is still in a low state of maturity.  If I was to use a human scale, the IT discipline is like a 5 year old copying its older brothers thinking it is all grown up.  Sure the IT Discipline has many elements that other more mature design and development disciplines have, however, the behavior, standards, ethics and other aspects around the profession have yet to develop.

This revelation is not new to me, years ago I had started quantifying how other design disciplines evolved and matured.  I had presented a corkscrew diagram at some conference back then and left it as an interesting phenomena.  As I was in a keynote session the image popped back in my mind and the book I had started but never finished.

What triggered that thought process was a discussion of the Enterprise Architecture discipline/practice.  This had triggered another memory of drafting a paper and proposal to create “The Architect’s Office” within an IT Organization I was working in.  Some of the issues are still the same which were taken from my studies in residential architecture and later field experience:  Architectural Practice is not like Howard Roark in Anne Rand’s The Fountainhead the majority of the time.  It is a social and community effort.

There are two aspects to successful architectural firms:

  • The Practice BOK –the body of knowledge and activities used to perform and deliver value to the client.  This is where most practitioners focus when discussing the discipline.  The mechanics of deliverable creation.   While this is the      foundation of any discipline and it grows as it matures, it is only part of the practice.  Many EA firms have yet to take that jump into operating the discipline as a business as opposed to only a methodology of delivery.
  • The Business –the selection of market, the value defined to be delivered, and the means on how value controlled and delivered (aka the Business Model).   Without knowing your business model Enterprise Architectures are prone to produce limited value to customers though providing what was requested.       Eventually, the practice could end up in a different business or on the corner with a sign “will architect for food” as the activities performed do not deliver an acceptable cost benefit ratio to  clients. This suggests that architects need to understand their market and alternatives to their delivery of value.       Many residential architects left the calling in the 70s & 80s as customers failed to see the value they provided over general contractors that had draftsman on staff.
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