Business Model Enablement

One of the problems with Enterprise Portfolio Management (EPM) is its’ limited focus.  EPM to a large extent has been dominated by technocrats that act as though the entire enterprise is populated primarily by hardware and software; that is people exist to serve hardware and software needs rather than the reverse.

One can hardly blame management for this perspective and behavior when you consider the management systems in place such as financial systems have not evolved much since the middle ages.  Financial systems are “thing” based, listing such artifacts as depreciable assets.  While executives give lip service with such fraises as “People are our most important asset”, the majority of systems account for people as liabilities. When was the last time you saw a balance sheet listing the value of the people employed within the corporation?  This seems rather odd considering H/W and S/W requires people and their skill and knowledge to operate, maintain, and gain benefit from these other assets.

This brings me back to business models, currently the rage within executive and VC circles.  In the Business Model Canvas activities and resources hold a key position.  Its though these two components that value is realized as per the company’s value proposition.  Yet often neither the activity or resources boxes account for the people component –expect as either partners to engage with or customers to engage with.

Yesterday’s R&D activities has me investigating corporate capabilities and the associated competencies of people that enable these capabilities which are used to enable the business model.  Several years ago I developed a competency model that was associated with the process activities for a major function within corporations.  I see revisiting that work in light of business models will likely produce the alignment between people, portfolio, and business model that I’m looking to address in this round of R&D.

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About briankseitz
I live in PacNW in a small town and work for Microsoft as a Enterprise strategy and architecture SME. I enjoy solving big complex problems, cooking and eating, woodworking and reading. I typically read between 4-8 business and technology books a month.

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