IT Planning and Agile

Some of the new organizations I’m dealing with are going crazy with “Agile”.  The Hype Cycle  is in full force.  Soon Agile with be advertised to put the kids to bed on time, solve world peace, and feed the world.  The problem I see is not with Agile its with its close cousin “Addle” which is often what I see organizations implementing (I.e., the worst of each methodology glued together).   I will point out that I am neither a zealot for Waterfall or Agile; its a tool and like other power tools –notice the woodworking reference– it should be used carefully.  Too often I’ve seen Agile be used for an excuse for poor or no planning and/or poor development practices.

If one reads the original materials, nowhere does it say don’t plan.  Actually it indicates you need plans, just not at the level of precision and scope previously and wrongly drummed into people’s heads.  Agile suggests or recommends planning in short enough horizons such that the problem doesn’t change before you finishes planning (accuracy) and to a granularity (precision) that is enough to get the job done.  Another way to look at it:

If my problem was to cross the river and you spent five years planning to build a bridge, by the time you actually built the bridge I may have cross the river with a boat and now I’m faced with climbing a mountain (problem has changed).  If I want something to sit on I may want a chair, but it may not need to be designed and constructed to 1 millionth of an inch tolerance –which would cost a significant amount.  I could probably get by with 1/32 of an inch, produced at lower cost but yielding the same level of performance I desire.  So in the end Agile is a balancing act that I believe still requires planning; just different types of planning and a whole lot of thinking.

 

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About briankseitz
I live in PacNW in a small town and work for Microsoft as a Enterprise strategy and architecture SME. I enjoy solving big complex problems, cooking and eating, woodworking and reading. I typically read between 4-8 business and technology books a month.

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