Knowledge Sharing

Spent the morning writing a summary of current project activity for a newsletter.  The team I’m on is relatively new and we’re just starting to establish processes and procedures for sharing knowledge and letting others in the organization know what we do and how we can help.   During writing my first draft I attempted to ensure it would not sound like some cold grey, boring status report; the kind you read and forget while you’re reading it.  While I’m writing this blog to generate content for a book I’m going to write this year –I don’t consider myself a writer, which is odd cause I’m such a voracious reader– it came to me that maybe more community wisdom would be shared if teams were required to write project histories in a blog rather than status reports.  Writing a project history entry seems to have me consider relating more aspect than: Did x, Cost y, Resulted in z or On schedule, On budget or project is Green, Yellow or Red status.

The history entry has me consider what we through was the problem and approach, what we discovered, how we adapted and what were the results.  If one looks at status reports these always seem to be the bare statistics not the story behind what happened and why.  I find that a terrible lost opportunity.  While I’ve not been a fan of autobiographies or biographies –I find talking to people about how they accomplished something or overcame an obstacle more insightful– as typically the Bios or at least the one’s I’ve read where more colorful status reports, not covering the deep insights and learnings.  This little morning insight may have me reconsider reading biographies a little deeper next time to see if the author really did but their insights down on paper.

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About briankseitz
I live in PacNW in a small town and work for Microsoft as a Enterprise strategy and architecture SME. I enjoy solving big complex problems, cooking and eating, woodworking and reading. I typically read between 4-8 business and technology books a month.

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